About This Site   Resources   Contact Us   Site Map   Terms of Use
 

your location: home > general > history > khangars and early bundelas

Khangars and Early Bundelas

 
  The massive seven-storied fort of Garh Kundar in Tikamgarh district

After the Chandelas, Khangars and early Bundelas emerged as local rulers in Bundelkhand.

The Khangars were listed in the 19th century by the British as one of the tribal groups of Bundelkhand. The Khangars themselves claim Rajput descent.

According to Khangar folk tradition, a Khangar warrior, Khet Singh, fought along with Prithviraj Chauhan in the war against the Chandela king Parmal, and was awarded part of the defeated king’s territory.

Khet Singh is believed to have made his capital in a massive seven-storied fort in Tikamgarh district, Garh Kundar. (By another version, the fort was built by the Chandelas). 

We know little about the Khangar 'kingdom' for over the next hundred years, till the emergence of a Bundela chief, Sohanpal.

The founder of the clan is said to be one Pancham, son of a king of  Varanasi, who was cheated of his share of the kingdom by his siblings.

Pancham is said to have performed penance in the shrine of Vindhyavasini Devi, one of the most well known mother goddess shrines in India, located in Mirzapur district, a little outside UP Bundelkhand.

When he received no sign of blessing from the Devi, Pancham proceeded to cut off his own head.  But no sooner than a drop or 'bund' of blood dropped on the floor that the Devi appeared and blessed him with the boon of a son would conquer large territories.

Thus, according to this version, arose the ruling clan of Bundelas - the name being derived from 'bund'.

One of Pancham's three sons, Sohanpal, is believed to have wrested Garh Kundar from the Khangars in the middle of the 13th century AD.

(This version is entirely denied by revivalist Khangars who state that the Khangars ruled over Garh Kundar till 1347, when they were vanquished by Mohammed Tughlaq, and all their women committed 'jauhar' by jumping into a well, which can be seen in the fort even today).

| Early History | Chandela Period | Khangars and Early Bundelas | Bundelas and Mughals | Gond Kingdom | Maharaj Chhatrasal | Entry of Marathas | Entry of British | 1857 Revolt | British Rule | Freedom Movement | Bundelkhand State? | Hold of Dacoits |

 
History
> Early History
> Chandela Period
> Khangars and Early Bundelas
> Bundelas and Mughals
> Gond Kingdom
> Maharaj Chhatrasal
> Entry of Marathas
> Entry of British
> 1857 Revolt
> British Rule
> Freedom Movement
> Bundelkhand State?
> Hold of Dacoits